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Re: What Makes a School (Classroom, Program) an "MI School (Classroom, Program)"?" Forum
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We want to share a story posted by one of our Primary and Secondary Course participants Shada Francis:



Question:  Choose an existing unit (topic,project) that can be approached from an "authentic problems" perspective..



Answer:  The topic that we covered in our lesson was on “Charities”. We touched on a few charities that was part of our lesson i.e. Unicef, WWC. S.P.C.A.. Communities in Crisis. These were part of our Humanities lesson taken from our Text Book. Students were grouped and each group was asked to research one of the charity organizations and to produce a PPT, explaining in details about the Organisations and their objectives. The class was asked to vote for an Organisation that they would like to sponsor or help. Most of them chose Unicef and Communities in Crisis. Students were asked to go back and brainstorm ways and ideas that we as a class can come up with, to help an organization in China, with Real Life Problems like what we had just studied. Two days later they decided that we should help the Migrant Children in China. Question? What can we do? How can we help? Who is going to help us to further this Idea? What is involved, i.e. time and money. This project was “HUGE”. We sat and discussed how we will meet our objectives. We realized that we were now facing Real Life Problems and the children were becoming very involved so we needed to work together and come up with more ideas and plans to find an organization that shared the same vision that my class had. ( to help the migrant children).



Question:  Develop three new experiences that address your unit's goals using an authentic problems approach and that further pluralize the unit.



Answer:  To further pluralize the unit we managed to find an Organisation called the Giving Tree and we invited one of their members to school and she explained to my class what and how they help the Migrant Children. My class, a rather noisy class were so attentive and ready to take the challenge. We were told that Giving Tree will supply us with bags and each bag must be filled with 5 new winter items(not old items). This was their/our biggest challenge. We presented this to our parents committee, some of them were not very happy to buy 5 new items. Now we had a problem, so I met with my students again and this time called in my Grade 10 group and they were excited to help us, in the end the Principal heard of our project and announced it at the teachers meeting. Well, it took us 2 month to fill 150 BAGS with new clothes and we were given the name of the school where the migrant children were. The Giving Tree organization has a party on the day the bags are delivered to the children. We managed to get some teachers involved and our school bus carried us with the children and the Bags to the Migrant school. It was such an awesome experience to witness the giving of the Bags with presents to the children. Our children also met the migrant children and they played and had fun with them, they also met other donors. All this happened because we used an Authentic Problem/Experience and found Real Life Solutions to the Problems at hand.. My greatest moment was watching my students handing out the bags and seeing the joy on the migrant children’s faces. Just to let you know I have been invited to join GT, and now active member of Giving Tree and we were able to help meet the target set by GT which was to hand out 15,000 Bags to Migrant Children throughout China.



One thing I "see" is that by taking an Authentic Problems Experience and allowing the children to work with it we are giving them the tools to find answers to Real Life Issues. One thing I "wonder" is that how many educators allow their students to find ways to broaden out their lessons and allow children of all ages to be more Authentic and present Real Life Issues to the class.



To pluralize the topic I would like this project to become sustainable, so we can go back and have some contact with the school and the children. My students are looking forward to inviting some of the migrant students to visit our school, this is going to allow friendships to grow and to see how the otehr half lives and how each one of us can play an important role in teh upliftment of lives.



I wonder why schools do not use pluralization as a must in the educational system. I WONDER??? I "think" that using an authentic problems approach in developing (pluralization) classroom experiences, allows both the teacher and student to go deeper and find more meaningful answers. We allow our children to be better thinkers, problem solvers. It allows for a new Mind Set and a new generation of quality thinkers that are able to be part of Real Life Issues   and Problem Solvers. I think we are setting a trend using the Authentic Problem Approach in our classrooms.



Photos are attached below with this posting.



Attach file:



jpg  DSC_72261.JPG (27.06 KB)
61_4d412e6955c0b.jpg 214X276 px

jpg  DSC_72421.JPG (49.93 KB)
61_4d412e734c3b4.jpg 320X213 px

jpg  DSC_74051.JPG (32.63 KB)
61_4d412e835b5e3.jpg 320X213 px

Posted on: 2011/1/27 15:16

Edited by admin on 2011/1/27 15:53:58
Edited by admin on 2011/1/27 15:54:12
Edited by MII on 2011/1/27 16:36:24
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Be a Robert
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In order to service you better, the Institute will be posting activties on a monthly basis for teachers that want to apply MI in the classrooms and parents that want to conduct MI activities at homes.  These activities are pulled from our partner schools and are written by researchers and experienced educators.  We welcome your comments and additions to the activity list to enrich the community.





Activity Title

Be a Robert





Triggered Intelligences    


 

Suggested Ages

*   Three

*   Four

*   Five





Domains   


Art

 

Materials and Equipment

1. Cardboard

2. Scissors

3. String

4. CD player and music with clear rhythm

 



 

Preparation

1. Please read the project description before you do the activities in this month’s theme.

2. Collect boxes until there is enough cardboard for all children to play.

 



 

Presentation

1. Invite children who want to participate to   pretend to be robots.

2. Cut the cardboard in to rectangles that match the lengths of your children’s upper arms, forearms, thighs and lower legs. Each child will need eight rectangles, two for the upper arms, two for the forearms, two for the thighs and two for the lower legs. Help them use the string to wrap and tie the cardboard rectangles around their limbs.

3. Play the music and invite them to dance.

4. Encourage them to talk about their experiences of dancing like robots. Ask them if their movements were stiff or flexible, and why.

 

 

Tips

When children are engaged in this activity, your questions and suggested inquiries should not be limited to the examples below. Think beyond the suggestions given to talk with children. Have real life conversations about the activity they are participating in so you can gain an understanding of what they already know and what they might want to know more about.

During this activity, you can talk with children about robots – there are many simple machines inside each robot. But the simple machines’ combinations and variations compose those complex machines.

 

This activity can be extended by: 

This activity can be extended by: inviting children to draw their own robot designs, or use recycled materials to build robots.

 

Feedback

We would love to hear your feedback and discussion on the following questions:

What is "MI" about this?

What else would you like to do with this kind of activities?

Are there other activities relating to these Intelligence?

 

Posted on: 2011/1/26 18:21
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Let’s Communicate
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In order to service you better, the Institute will be posting activties on a monthly basis for teachers that want to apply MI in the classrooms and parents that want to conduct MI activities at homes.  These activities are pulled from our partner schools and are written by researchers and experienced educators.  We welcome your comments and additions to the activity list to enrich the community.







Activity Title

Let’s Communicate



Triggered Intelligences    






Suggested Ages

*   Three

*   Four

*   Five



Domains   



 

Materials and Equipment

        1.  Large white flip chart (purchased from Staples)

2. Black marker

3. Daily Newspaper

 

Preparation

1.       At a Circle Time before you do this activity with children, show them the daily newspaper. Find out what they know about newspapers. Tell them that you are going to be starting Circle Time each day, asking children to share a story about something that happened at home the night before, or that morning before they came to school, or something that happened last week and that might happen in the future.

 

Presentation

1. Write clearly – School News – across the top of the first sheet of the flip chart.

2. Invite your children to take turns sharing their stories.

3. Before children begin speaking, write their names on the left side of the paper. As they tell their stories, write down  their words exactly as they say them.

4. When a child finishes a story, have them invite their classmates to ask questions, or make comments – “Any questions or comments?”

5. If you put the flip chart on a tripod, you can stand up when you write. This will give them the best view of letter formation.

6. If you don’t have a tripod, you can lay the flip chart on the floor, or you can place it on a table.

7. After your children have finished sharing their stories, read them out-loud, sweeping your finger under each word as you go.

8. News of the Day is something you can do with your children any and/or every day of the school year.

 

Tips

When children are engaged in this activity, your questions and suggested inquiries should not be limited to the examples below. Think beyond the suggestions given to talk with children. Have real life conversations about the activity they are participating in so you can gain an understanding of what they already know and what they might want to know more about.

New of the Day provides children with an opportunity to go beyond the here-and-now in conversing with their fellow classmates. It is an invitation to children to re-call and re-tell. It is also an opportunity for children to understand how their families are similar and different from others, and develop respect for similarities and differences between themselves and others.

 

This activity can be extended by: 

This activity can be extended by: publishing News of the Day, and sending a copy home with each child at the end of the school year.

 

Feedback



We would love to hear your feedback and discussion on the following questions:

What is "MI" about this?

What else would you like to do with this kind of activities?

Are there other activities relating to these Intelligence?

Posted on: 2011/1/26 18:18

Edited by MII on 2011/2/1 9:16:22
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Honey Bees
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In order to service you better, the Institute will be posting activties on a monthly basis for teachers that want to apply MI in the classrooms and parents that want to conduct MI activities at homes.  These activities are pulled from our partner schools and are written by researchers and experienced educators.  We welcome your comments and additions to the activity list to enrich the community.







Activity Title



Honey Bees





Triggered Intelligences    

    

  • Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence

  • Naturalist Intelligence




 

Suggested Ages



*   Three

*   Four

*   Five





Domains   

  • Scientific Thinking

  • Physical & Health






Materials and Equipment



1. Yellow and black yarn

2. Cardboard





Preparation




1. Find two circles (e.g. a bowl and a cup) you can trace to make a circle and then a smaller circle in the middle of a piece of cardboard, and cut them out.

2. The little pom pom bees your children will make are cute, but they don’t resemble bees at all. Primarily, they are meant to help start a conversation with children about bees.

3. Most people learn from childhood, that bees should be avoided because they sting. So, most people grow up thinking of bees as pests. But, bees are central to the production of almost all of the fruits and vegetables we eat, and around the world, they are disappearing.

4. At a Circle Time before you make honey bees, find out what children know about honey bees, and bees in general. Ask them to share any experiences they may have had with bees.



 

Presentation



1. To make one pom pom you first need to sit two circles together.

2. Give each child who wishes to create a bee, two long lengths of yarn – one yellow, and one black.

3. Children wind the yarn around the two circles. Remind them to keep it nice and firm as they wind.

4. They should keep winding all the way around the circle until they can’t see any more cardboard.

5. Cut the yarn all the way around the outside edge of the circle.

6. Lightly separate the two pieces of cardboard and slide another piece of yarn in here.

7. Pull it all the way around the circle and tie it in a very tight knot to hold the pom pom in place.

8. Use the monofilament to hang the yellow and black bees from the ceiling above the flowers.



 

Tips



When children are engaged in this activity, your questions and suggested inquiries should not be limited to the examples below. Think beyond the suggestions given to talk with children. Have real life conversations about the activity they are participating in so you can gain an understanding of what they already know and what they might want to know more about.

Throughout the world, bee populations are in danger of complete collapse. The reason for this population decline is still unknown, but scientists around the world are concerned as bees perform a central role in both the ecosystem and in agriculture.

Scientists say people can help save the bees if they are willing to take action. For example, they can plant bee friendly flora in their yards. Bees like flowers that are shaped like daisies (such as sunflowers) and they also like tall plants, like hollyhocks, and their favorite colors appear to be purple, blue, white and yellow.





This activity can be extended by: 



This activity can be extended by: taking paper on clipboards, and colored pencils outside, and drawing some of the flowers that are in bloom around your school; then mounting the drawings on the wall near your tree.



 




Feedback



We would love to hear your feedback and discussion on the following questions:

What is "MI" about this?

What else would you like to do with this kind of activities?

Are there other activities relating to  these Intelligence?


Posted on: 2010/12/23 12:03
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The People in my family
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In order to service you better, the Institute will be posting activties on a monthly basis for teachers that want to apply MI in the classrooms and parents that want to conduct MI activities at homes.  These activities are pulled from our partner schools and are written by researchers and experienced educators.  We welcome your comments and additions to the activity list to enrich the community.







Activity Title



The People in my family





Triggered Intelligences    



   *    Linguistic Intelligence

   *    Spatial Intelligence

   *    Interpersonal Intelligence

   *    Logical-Mathematical Intelligence

   *    Intrapersonal Intelligence

 

Suggested Ages



*   Four



Domains

   

  • Personal

  • Social

  • Mathematical Thinking






Materials 
 and Equipment





1. A large piece of paper long enough to fit all your children’s names across the top (for creating a graph)

2. Small pieces of paper (3’’X3’’) (for children to draw on)

3. Markers or Crayons (for children to draw the people in their family)

4. Glue Stick (to adhere the small pieces of paper to the large paper)





Preparation



1. Create a column 31/2 inches wide (one for each child in your class) running along the length of the large piece of paper.

2. Write the name of each child (one per column) at the top of the paper.



 

 Presentation



1. Invite the children to name each of the members of their family.

2. Invite them to draw each member of their family on the small pieces of paper, one member per piece of paper.

3. Suggest they start with themselves, so that they can glue their portrait just under their name.

4. Then place each portrait of each member of each child’s family in the column under his/her name.

5. At the bottom of each child’s column write the number of family members in each child’s family.





Tips




limited to the examples below. Think beyond the suggestions given to talk with children. Have real life conversations about the activity they are participating in so you can gain an understanding of what they already know and what they might want to know more about.

As children begin to draw their family members, talk with them about the parts of the body. If a child is drawing her mother, ask her if she knows the color of her mother’s eyes and hair. If a child is drawing a picture of a sibling, ask him if his sibling is older or younger than he.





This activity can be extended by: 




playing “house” in the Dramatic Play Center, building houses in the Block Center and adding small wooden furniture and wooden people, and reading books about families (even animal families).



 




Feedback



We would love to hear your feedback and discussion on the following questions:

What is "MI" about this?

What else would you like to do with this kind of activities?

Are there other activities relating to  these Intelligence?


Posted on: 2010/12/23 11:50
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Feet Painting
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In order to service you better, the Institute will be posting activties on a monthly basis for teachers that want to apply MI in the classrooms and parents that want to conduct MI activities at homes.  These activities are pulled from our partner schools and are written by researchers and experienced educators.  We welcome your comments and additions to the activity list to enrich the community.







Activity Title



Feet Painting





Triggered Intelligences    






  • Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence

  • Linguistic Intelligence

  • Spatial Intelligence

  • Intrapersonal Intelligence





       Suggested Ages



    *   Three



    Learning Domains




*   Art



Materials 
 and Equipment





1. Two trays (for holding paint)

2. Liquid paint (to put in trays)

3. Long sheets of paper one for each child (to walk across)

4. Plastic Tub (for washing feet)

5. Towel (for drying feet)





Preparation



1. Mix two different colors of paint.

2. Pour each of the colors into each of the trays.

3. Lay down long sheets of paper.

4. Place the trays at one end.

5. Place the plastic tub and towel (with warm water) at the other end.





 

 Presentation



1. Before the children begin, talk to them about the different ways people can paint… “Sometimes people use brushes to paint, sometimes they use their hands. Do you think they can use their feet?

2. Have children remove their shoes and socks, and roll up their trousers.

3. Hold a child’s hand as he/she steps into the trays of paint (one foot in each of the trays), and then on to the paper.

4. Let go of the child’s hand as he/she walks across the paper.

5. Children should be allowed to walk through the paint and across the paper as many times as they like.







Tips



When children are engaged in this activity, your questions and suggested inquiries should not be limited to the examples below. Think beyond the suggestions given to talk with children. Have real life conversations about the activity they are participating in so you can gain an understanding of what they already know and what they might want to know more about.

To keep it safe have only one child at a time painting with his/her feet. If a child wants to walk across his/her paper more than once, have that child turn back, and while walking on the paper go back for more paint.

When a child is waking through the paint you can ask how it feels, use descriptive words such as slippery, smooth, and cold etc.








This activity can be extended by: 




reading books about feet i.e. One Foot Two Foot Red Foot Blue Foot by Dr. Seuss



 



Feedback



We would love to hear your feedback and discussion on the following questions:

What is "MI" about this?

What else would you like to do with this kind of activities?

Are there other activities relating to  these Intelligence?


Posted on: 2010/11/24 12:49
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Shoe Box Apartment
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In order to service you better, the Institute will be posting activties on a monthly basis for teachers that want to apply MI in the classrooms and parents that want to conduct MI activities at homes.  These activities are pulled from our partner schools and are written by researchers and experienced educators.  We welcome your comments and additions to the activity list to enrich the community.







Activity Title



Shoe Box Apartment





Triggered Intelligences    

  

  • Linguistic Intelligence

  • Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence

  • Spatial Intelligence

  • Interpersonal Intelligence

  • Intrapersonal Intelligence






Suggested Ages



*   Four





Learning Domains





  • Language and Literacy

  • Physical & Health

  • Art

  • Social

  • Social Studies






Materials 
 and Equipment




1. Shoe boxes (one for each child)

2. Paper (an assortment of colors and textures)

3. Magazines

4. Fabric scraps

5. Recycled materials such as plastic bottle caps, wine corks etc.

6. Modeling clay

7. Markers

8. Scissors

9. Glue





Preparation



1. Well before you are ready to do this activity, ask parents to bring an empty shoe box to school.

2. At a Circle Time before you do this activity, tell the children about your request for shoe boxes.

3. Tell them that once there are enough (one for everyone) you are going to ask them to use their shoe boxes to make dioramas of their bedrooms.

4. Ask them to go home, and make a list (with the help of a parent) of all the things in their bedrooms, and bring their lists back to school.





 Presentation




1. Place all the materials (adding the shoe box lids to the list above) on or near the table where children will be working.

2. Have their lists from home at the table, and read each child’s list to her before she gets to work.

3. Invite children to look carefully at all the materials on the table before they get to work, so they can decide what to use to “make a bed” for example.

4. It could take several days before all children who chose to participate have

completed their construction.

5. Once everyone is done, glue the boxes together side by side and on top of each other to construct an “apartment” building.





Tips





When children are engaged in this activity, your questions and suggested inquiries should not be

limited to the examples below. Think beyond the suggestions given to talk with children. Have

real life conversations about the activity they are participating in so you can gain an understanding of what they already know and what they might want to know more about.

When children are busy working, encourage them to talk to one another about how their bedrooms are the same and how they are different.





This activity can be extended by: 





putting the “apartment” house somewhere in the room where children can play with it.





Feedback



We would love to hear your feedback and discussion on the following questions:

What is "MI" about this?

What else would you like to do with this kind of activities?

Are there other activities relating to  these Intelligence?


Posted on: 2010/11/24 12:38
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Let's go to the moon
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In order to service you better, the Institute will be posting activties on a monthly basis for teachers that want to apply MI in the classrooms and parents that want to conduct MI activities at homes.  These activities are pulled from our partner schools and are written by researchers and experienced educators.  We welcome your comments and additions to the activity list to enrich the community.







Activity Title



Let's go to the moon





Triggered Intelligences   



*   Interpersonal Intelligence

*   Naturalist Intelligence





Suggested Ages



*   Three

*   Four





Learning Domains



*   Scientific Thinking

*   Social





Materials  and Equipment



1. One gallon Plastic water jugs(empty and dry ,one for each child)

2. Utility knives or sharp teachers scissors

3. Star stickers(and planet stickers if you can find them)

4. Plastic vegetable trays for stickers





Preparation



Ask parents, well ahead of time, to each bring in one plastic (on gallon) empty water jug.





 Presentation



1. It’s good for children to see their teachers using real tools.

2. At a table where you have placed the stickers, sit and cut the top off of each jug.

3. Then, cut an opening in one side of the jug big enough to allow children to look out from under their astronaut helmets!

4. Invite them to decorate their helmets with the stickers.

5. While you are working, ask them what they know about the moon(the moon is a light source at night).





Tips




When children are engaged in this activity, your questions and suggested inquiries should not be limited to the examples below. Think beyond the suggestions given to talk with children. Have 31real life conversations about the activity they are participating in so you can gain an understanding of what they already know and what they might want to know more about.

Ask children if any of them have ever been outside at night when the moon is full. Ask them if they know that Chinese astronauts went up in space shortly after school started. They went on a three day mission in a spacecraft named ShenzhouVll. One of the astronauts walked in space. In twelve years from now, China wants to send a spacecraft to land on the moon.





This activity can be extended by: 



Using either large boxes, or furniture in your classroom to construct a spacecraft, and taking a pretend trip to the moon.





Feedback



We would love to hear your feedback and discussion on the following questions:

What is "MI" about this?

What else would you like to do with this kind of activities?

Are there other activities relating to  these Intelligence?

Posted on: 2010/10/22 12:18
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Weaving
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In order to service you better, the Institute will be posting activties on a monthly basis for teachers that want to apply MI in the classrooms and parents that want to conduct MI activities at homes.  These activities are pulled from our partner schools and are written by researchers and experienced educators.  We welcome your comments and additions to the activity list to enrich the community.







Activity Title



weaving





Triggered Intelligences   

*   Logical-mathematical Intelligence

*   Spatial Intelligence

*   Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence





Suggested Ages



*   Three

*   Four

*   Five





Learning Domains



*   Mathematical Thinking

*   Physical % Health

*   Art

*   Personal

*   Social Studies

*   Language and Literacy





Materials  and Equipment



*   loom

*   yarn





Preparation



 


Make sure loom is secured

prepare a sample(s) ahead of time for showing to the class

wind small balls of yarn in a variety of colors and thickness



 

Presentation



1. Begin with a brief discussion of weaving and what it is (the interlacing of threads to form a continuous piece of fabric). Write vocabulary list on board and discuss. Show example(s).

a) Weaving — The process of forming cloth or fabric on a loom by interlacing yarn or thread (or, as in this case, paper).

b) Loom — A frame for weaving yarn or thread into cloth or fabric.

c) Warp — Threads running lengthwise on the loom. The warp is placed on the loom prior to beginning the weaving process.

d) Weft — Threads that are weaved across the warp threads to form the web.

e) Web — The cloth or fabric produced by weaving.

2. Distribute materials and tools.

3. Students tie the end of a yarn (will serve as the "weft”) to the warp

4. Begin by weaving one "weft thread" over one "warp thread" then under the next warp and over the next, etc.

5. Continue this process alternating over and under with each weft thread. If the previous weft thread went under the warp thread, the following row will begin by going over the warp.

 




Tips



Make sure to comb the “weft thread” up to tighten the weave.

This is a project that takes time to finish. It is best if it can be done over an extended period of time




 

This activity can be extended by: 



use a variety of textile or random objects that can be weaved in.

 Paper weaving

 Finished projects can be displayed individually or assembled into an attractive and interesting ensemble.

 This project can be expanded to challenge the creativity of students by using more colors, making the weft threads thinner and the designs more detailed. The warp can be measured using rulers and will result in more precise designs. The simple over-under sequence can be altered from every other warp to every second or even third warp to form a regular pattern that will differ from the standard "checker board" style design.

 Have a big loom in the classroom available for the children to do it during center time.







Feedback



We would love to hear your feedback and discussion on the following questions:

What is "MI" about this?

What else would you like to do with this kind of activities?

Are there other activities relating to  these Intelligence?

Posted on: 2010/10/22 12:10
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Treasure Hunt
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In order to service you better, the Institute will be posting activties on a monthly basis for teachers that want to apply MI in the classrooms and parents that want to conduct MI activities at homes.  These activities are pulled from our partner schools and are written by researchers and experienced educators.  We welcome your comments and additions to the activity list to enrich the community.







Activity Title



Treasure Hunt





Triggered Intelligences



*   Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence 



*   Linguistic Intelligence





Suggested Ages



*   Two





Learning Domains



*   Language and Literacy



*   Physical & Health





Materials and Equipment




1. Three 600mm plastic water bottles (empty and dry) with lids

2. Table salt (enough to fill each bottle ? full)

3. A collection of pretty things small enough to fit through the mouth of the bottle (marbles, sequins, a bit of ribbon etc.)

4. White glue





Preparation




1. Fill two of the plastic bottles with the table salt ? full.

2. Drop several of the pretty things in to the bottles.

3. Put some glue on the inside edges of the bottle caps and screw them down tight.





Presentation



1. Take the third bottle to Circle Time along with the salt, pretty things and glue.

2. Let the children watch you drop pretty things in to the bottle.

3. Let them see you fill the bottle with salt.

4. Tell them why you are putting glue on the cap, and then screw it down tight.

5. Gently roll the bottle around on its side and upside down.

6. As the pretty things come in to view, stop and ask the children to name them.

7. After Circle Time, place the bottle along with the other two in a place where children can easily explore them on their own.

 



Tips



When children are engaged in this activity, your questions and suggested inquiries should not be

limited to the examples below. Think beyond the suggestions given to talk with children. Have real life conversations about the activity they are participating in so you can gain an understanding of what they already know and what they might want to know more about.

When you do this activity at Circle Time, tell the children that you are making a Treasure Bottle, so that they can go with you on a Treasure Hunt.

Their excitement at seeing the bits of treasure appear can be so great that it might be hard for them to raise their hands. Invite them to call out if the “spy” something.



 


This activity can be extended by:



putting salt in your Sand and Water Box with some larger pretty things and some wire strainers. The children can dig down in to the salt, and watch the salt sift through the strainer to discover if they have captured an object.





Feedback



We would love to hear your feedback and discussion on the following questions:

What is "MI" about this?

What else would you like to do with this kind of activities?

Are there other activities relating to  Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence?

 


Posted on: 2010/9/21 15:38
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