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What Makes a School (Classroom, Program) an "MI School (Classroom, Program)"?" Forum
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What Makes a School (Classroom, Program) an "MI School (Classroom, Program)"?"

There's no right answer to this question, but as Dr. Gardner notes, "There are programs that are more or less 'in the spirit' of MI theory. 

What do you consider to be 'in the spirit' of MI? 
Howard Gardner suggests that the basic application of MI involves engaging learners in key topics, content, concepts, domains in a variety of ways; and individualization.  If  you look at the hundreds , if not thousands, of MI programs, you'll see great diversity. Do the quality, successful  programs address these two practices?

This forum is a space for you to share and discuss:
1) Applications of MI theory from the perspective of "How is this 'in the spirit of MI'?
  Let's get to a deeper understanding of MI theory, as well as its application, by exploring how it's been interpreted and put to use.


2) Research questions and projects related to MI applications

3) Your questions about applying MI theory. 
Through this forum, you may connect with someone with the same question or with a response-in-practice.

4) Your thoughts about MI practices that Forum monitors share in this Forum.

Posted on: 2010/1/10 18:22

Edited by MII on 2010/1/23 5:31:10
Edited by MII on 2010/1/23 5:44:54
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Re: Theme of How to Become an MI School and MI Success Stories Forum
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I'm interested in seeing how the application of MI theory can contribute to the learning of a second language (french) in primary school.

Posted on: 2010/1/18 17:13
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Re: Theme of How to Become an MI School and MI Success Stories Forum
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I see a lot of emphasis on MI application at youth level. What about its application at adult level? I would like to open an ESL school based solely on MI theory. (All the ESL teachers are to be trained using this method.) However, beside teaching children, for whom the MI theory seems to be the most effective, I would like to be able to apply it effectively at adult level. Are there any studies indicating the extend to which adults accept being taught using the MI theory and, if yes, how effective is it? They will have to be convinced that they are being taught in a way that is completely different from the way they've been taught before. Is there an efficient way to convince them knowing the high degree of difficulty in changing habits especially mind and leaning habits. Thank you. Roxy

Posted on: 2010/1/20 9:41
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Re: What Makes a School (Classroom, Program) an "MI School (Classroom, Program)"?" Forum
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Is there anyone from your specialists able to answer the questions above please? Thank you. Roxana

Posted on: 2010/2/19 3:47
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Re: What Makes a School (Classroom, Program) an "MI School (Classroom, Program)"?" Forum
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Hi, Roxana,

As a matter of fact, I co-led a 5 year study called 'Adult Multiple Intelligences" Project.  My colleague Silja Kallenbach and I worked with several teachers and their students in adult education: basic education, GED/h.s. diploma, and English as a Second Language contexts.  There were some resources that resulted, including the AMI Sourcebook, published by Teachers College Press. 

We found that it was sometimes a hard sell, this MI business, partly because being in the adult education system, they felt things were getting 'dumbed down' for them.  This in part was due to some too literal translations of the use of MI with younger students -the playdoh and such.  We found incredible power in using MI as a self-reflection tool for these adults to identify their strengths, and possible entry points to their preparing for the equivalency test or getting their adult h.s. diploma, or learning English.  Our ESL teachers primarily jazzed up their efforts by thinking 'outside the box' in coming up with curriculum and activities for their English learners.

Once they recognized what this 'different way of doing things' was all about, they became its biggest boosters.  Many of these folks said, " I wished they were using this when I was in school" and "How can I use this to help my kids with school".    

Cheers, Julie
 

Posted on: 2010/2/21 6:28
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Hi,

Have you tried using MI to enhance French-learning?
A colleague of mine in Poland is asking that same question, except with children whose mother-tongue is Polish.  I'll see if she can join us here and give us some insights!

From a broader point of you, and it's likely you've thought about it  in this way, MI has been used in second language learning to expand the entry points through which students learn the language - sometimes as simply as learning the "jargon" of a student interest, for example focusing on learning about music by studying music in French, french music. 

I believe MI also helps us think about using language authentically and meaningfully when we are teaching it. Also, thinking about how the different intelligences come into play in communication (not just 'talking') in the real world -- intra and interpersonal, even logical math... This helps teachers come up with ways of student experiencing of language in their learning settings, that emphasizes the use of their strong intelligences important to making meaningful language.  For example, all students, but with an eye toward students who are strong interpersonally, would participate in activities to learn French that emphasize interpersonal intelligence; similarly with bodily kinesthetic.  

I'll stop there and look forward to your thoughts and additions to this discussion.

Best, Julie


 

Posted on: 2010/2/21 6:38
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MI in EFL and Language Learning
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Hello,

A good place to start for implementing MI theory in a private or public foreign language program is taking a professional development course in MI from the MI institute or Harvard Graduate School. Then take an IDLTM from Cambridge - there's one in Barcelona every year.  Once you have a good grasp of the theory, then you are in a better position to implement MI-infused language classes.  After that, you should visit a MI school, like New City in St. Louis to get an idea of the best practices and atmosphere of an MI-infused school. 

Beyond all of the above, there are a couple of good books I can recommend:

"Becoming a MI School" by Tom Hoerr

"Multiple Intelligences in the Elementary Classroom" by Susan Baum, Julie Viens, and Barbara Slatin

and "Multiple Intelligences in the EFL Classroom" by Herbert Puchta and Mario Rinvolucri  (please use caution with this book, the exercises can be a waste if not used in conjuction with MI best practices)


If you're serious about this, you can skip much of the above by getting in touch with me either by email or through my website, as low-cost business consulting with private language schools in Europe is my specialty.  I will be in Cambridge and Oxford at the end of the month if you'd like to arrange a meeting.  

Josh Lange
Dresden, Germany 

http://mitraining.schools.officelive.com

Posted on: 2010/3/3 1:34
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Re: What Makes a School (Classroom, Program) an "MI School (Classroom, Program)"?" Forum
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There is program in Russian/Ukraine language? :)

Posted on: 2010/3/16 2:41
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Re: What Makes a School (Classroom, Program) an "MI School (Classroom, Program)"?" Forum
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MI approaches can create an enhanced learning environment, in harmony with Krashen's principles: *A RICH VARIETY OF COMPREHENSIBLE INPUT *A LOW-ANXIETY SITUATION *REAL MESSAGES OF REAL INTEREST A short (1 to 3 minutes) close-captioned movie segment offers the learner a synergistic schemata of opportunities for comprehensible INPUT. The visual images themselves are comprehensible and are stored in the students' memories as EXPERIENCES, rather than as a language lesson that must be "studied/learned" because the teacher will test the students for their ability to "remember" the lesson. A schematic tapestry of English words becomes associated with the movie's images and emotions. Plot, character,music, emotion--these are the 'hooks' by which the language becomes comprehensible input and stored intake. This dynamic is quite different from the artificial approaches typically used--vocabulary lists, linear progressions in grammar complexity etc.) To use another metaphor, the memories of the movie segment can be seen as gravitational schemata which can attract and retain words associated with the images. As the learner thinks of a scene, an ever-expanding constellation of words and sentences can become linked in the memory with a pleasant (LOW-ANXIETY) experience, rich with REAL MESSAGES OF REAL INTEREST. As the learner thinks of one character, a tremendous variety of adjectives and actions can become part of the schemata. This is in harmony with the episode hypothesis, which states that "text (i.e. discourse in any form) will be easier to produce, understand, and recall to the extent that it is motivated and structured episodically...these ideas lead to the supposition that perhaps second language teaching would be more successful if it incorporated principles of good story writing along with the benefits of sound linguistic analysis." (Oller) In addition to discussion/description of movie segments, learners also should be active in role play based upon the movie segments. In Why Drama Works: A Psycholinguistic, Susan Stern at UCLA brings together a wide range of research relating to the power of role play for creating an enjoyable and effective second language environment: Motivation Self-esteem Sensitivity to rejection Empathy Spontaneity ( from my http://tinyurl.com/ChinaMovieMagic )

Posted on: 2010/3/24 17:19
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Re: What Makes a School (Classroom, Program) an "MI School (Classroom, Program)"?" Forum
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Thank you all for your input and Josh I am serious about it. I will contact you soon. Thank you. Roxy

Posted on: 2010/6/16 8:07
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